Samuel Chao Chung Ting


Samuel Chao Chung Ting
(1936)


American physicist who shared in the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1976 for his discovery of a new subatomic particle, the J/psi particle.
The son of a Chinese college professor who was studying in the United States when Ting was born, he was raised in mainland China and Taiwan and at the age of 20 emigrated to the United States. He was educated at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he received his doctorate in 1962. Ting taught briefly at Columbia University and was group leader at a nuclear facility at Hamburg, W.Ger., before joining the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, in 1967, becoming a professor in 1969.

In 1974 in experiments conducted at the Brookhaven National Laboratory at Upton, Long Island, N.Y., Ting discovered a new subatomic particle that he called the J-particle (now usually called the J/psi particle), the first of a new class of very massive, long-lived mesons. The discovery of this particle, which is thought to be composed of a charmed quark and its antiquark, led to a significant expansion and refinement of the quark model. For this discovery Ting was awarded the 1976 Nobel Prize for Physics jointly with Burton Richter, who had made the same discovery independently at almost the same time. At the time of the award Ting was conducting research at the European Commission for Nuclear Research (CERN) at Geneva.



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