Sir Nevill Francis Mott


Sir Nevill Francis Mott
(1905 - 1996)


English physicist who shared (with P.W. Anderson and J.H. Van Vleck of the United States) the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1977 for his independent researches on the magnetic and electrical properties of noncrystalline, or amorphous, semiconductors.
Mott earned bachelor's (1927) and master's (1930) degrees at the University of Cambridge. He became a professor of theoretical physics at the University of Bristol in 1933. At Bristol his work in solid-state physics included studies of metals and metal alloys, semiconductors, and photographic emulsions. In 1938 Mott devised the theoretical description of the effect that light has on a photographic emulsion at the atomic level. In 1954 he became Cavendish professor of experimental physics at the University of Cambridge, retiring in 1971.

Mott's studies of electrical conduction in various metals led him in the 1960s to explore the conductivity potential of amorphous materials, which are so called because their atomic structures are irregular or unstructured. He devised formulas describing the transitions that glass and other amorphous substances can make between electrically conductive (metallic) states and insulating (nonmetallic) states, thereby functioning as semiconductors. These glassy substances, which are relatively simple and cheap to produce, eventually replaced more expensive crystalline semiconductors in many electronic switching and memory devices, and this in turn led to more affordable personal computers, pocket calculators, copying machines, and other electronic devices. Mott was knighted in 1962.




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