Stanley Cohen


Stanley Cohen
(1922)


American biochemist who, with Rita Levi-Montalcini, shared the 1986 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for his researches on substances produced in the body that influence the development of nerve and skin tissues.
Cohen was educated at Brooklyn College (B.A., 1943), Oberlin College (M.A., 1945), and at the University of Michigan, where he received a Ph.D. in biochemistry in 1948. He joined Levi-Montalcini at Washington University, St. Louis, Mo., as a researcher in 1952. His training as a biochemist enabled him to help isolate nerve growth factor, a natural substance that Levi-Montalcini had found stimulated the growth of nerve cells and fibres. Cohen found another cell growth factor in the chemical extracts that contained the nerve growth factor. He discovered that this substance caused the eyes of newborn mice to open and their teeth to erupt several days sooner than normal. Cohen termed this substance epidermal growth factor (EGF), and he went on to purify it and completely analyze its chemistry. He and his coworkers found that EGF influences a great range of developmental events in the body. He also discovered the mechanisms by which EGF is taken into and acts upon individual cells.

Cohen conducted his research at Washington University until 1959, upon which he moved to Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn., becoming professor of biochemistry there in 1967.



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