George Emil Palade


George Emil Palade
(1912)



Romanian-born American cell biologist who developed tissue-preparation methods, advanced centrifuging techniques, and conducted electron microscopy studies that resulted in the discovery of several cellular structures. With Albert Claude and Christian de Duve he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1974.
Palade received a degree in medicine from the University of Bucharest in 1940 and remained there as a professor until after World War II. He immigrated to the United States in 1946 and began work at the Rockefeller Institute in New York.

Palade performed many studies on the internal organization of such cell structures as mitochondria, chloroplasts, the Golgi apparatus, and others. His most important discovery was that microsomes, bodies formerly thought to be fragments of mitochondria, are actually parts of the endoplasmic reticulum (internal cellular transport system) and have a high ribonucleic acid (RNA) content. They were subsequently named ribosomes.

Palade became a naturalized citizen of the United States in 1952 and in 1958 a professor of cytology at Rockefeller Institute, which he left in 1972 to direct studies in cell biology at Yale University Medical School.


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