Eric F. Wieschaus


Eric F. Wieschaus
(1947)


American developmental biologist who shared the 1995 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine with geneticists Edward B. Lewis and Christiane Nusslein-Volhard for discovering the genetic controls of early embryonic development. Working together with Nusslein-Volhard, Wieschaus expanded upon the innovative work of Lewis, who likewise based his studies on the fruit fly, or vinegar fly (Drosophila melanogaster), a popular species for genetic experiments.
Wieschaus graduated from the University of Notre Dame (B.S., 1969) and Yale University (Ph.D., 1974) and pursued postdoctoral work at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. He began working with Nusslein-Volhard at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (1978-81) in Heidelberg, W.Ger. In 1981 he joined the faculty of Princeton University as assistant professor, later becoming associate professor (1983) and full professor (1987).

With Nusslein-Volhard at Heidelberg, Wieschaus examined mutations in 40,000 fruit fly families, discovering that about 5,000 of the fly's 20,000 genes are important to embryonic development and about 140 are essential. Their research, published in the English scientific journal Nature in 1980, generated the widely accepted model that three sets of genes control subdivision in the developing embryo: gap genes, a blueprint for general body development; pair-rule genes, which subdivide these general regions into body segments; and segment-polarity genes, which affect specific structures within these segments. Their work helped scientists to better understand congenital mutations in other animals, including humans.



Main Page | About Us | All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License. Timeline of Nobel Prize Winners is not affiliated with The Nobel Foundation. External sites are not endorsed or supported by http://www.nobel-winners.com/ Copyright © 2003 All Rights Reserved.