Edward B. Lewis


Edward B. Lewis
(1918)


American developmental geneticist who, along with geneticists Christiane Nusslein-Volhard and Eric F. Wieschaus, was awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for discovering the functions that control early embryonic development.
Lewis' interest in genetics was kindled in high school. He studied biostatistics at the University of Minnesota (B.A., 1939) and genetics at the California Institute of Technology (Ph.D., 1942), where he spent his professional career. Working independently of Nusslein-Volhard and Wieschaus, Lewis based his research on studies of the fruit fly, or vinegar fly (Drosophila melanogaster), a popular species for genetic experiments. By crossbreeding thousands of flies he was able to establish that genes are generally arranged on the chromosome in the same order as their corresponding body segments--e.g., the first set of genes controls the head and thorax; the middle set, the abdomen; and the final set, posterior parts. This orderliness is known as the colinearity principle. Lewis also found that genetic regulatory functions may overlap. For example, a fly with an extra set of wings has a defective gene not in the abdominal region but in the thoracic region, which normally functions as a regulator of such mutations.

Lewis' work on the fruit fly helped to explain mechanisms of general biological development, such as the causes of congenital deformities, in humans and other higher organisms. The results of his longtime research were published in Nature magazine in 1978. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1968 and received the National Medal of Science in 1990.



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