Bert Sakmann


Bert Sakmann
(1942)


German medical doctor and research scientist who in 1991, together with German physicist Erwin Neher, won the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for research into basic cell function and for their development of the patch-clamp technique--a laboratory method widely used in cell biology and neuroscience to detect electrical currents as small as a trillionth of an ampere through cell membranes.
From 1969 to 1970 Sakmann served as a research assistant in the department of neurophysiology at the Max Planck Institute for Psychiatry and then finished his postdoctoral studies in the department of biophysics at University College, London. After receiving his medical degree from the University of Gottingen in 1974, Sakmann joined the department of neurobiology at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, where he shared laboratory space with Neher.

Working together, the two men used the patch-clamp technique to conclusively establish the existence of characteristic sets of ion channels in cell membranes--some of which permit the flow of only positive ions, while others pass only negatively charged ions. This established, they examined a broad range of cellular functions, eventually discovering the role that ion channels play in such diseases as diabetes, cystic fibrosis, epilepsy, several cardiovascular diseases, and certain neuromuscular disorders. These discoveries enabled the development of new and more specific drug therapies.

In 1979 Sakmann became a research associate in the Max Planck Institute's membrane biology group. He was made head of the membrane physiology unit in 1983, and he became director of the institute's department of cell physiology two years later.

 


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