Sir Andrew Fielding Huxley


Sir Andrew Fielding Huxley
(1917)



English physiologist, cowinner (with Sir Alan Hodgkin and Sir John Carew Eccles) of the 1963 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. His researches centred on nerve and muscle fibres and dealt particularly with the chemical phenomena involved in the transmission of nerve impulses. He received a knighthood in 1974.
Andrew Fielding, a grandson of the biologist T.H. Huxley and son of the biographer and man of letters Leonard Huxley, received his M.A. from Trinity College, Cambridge, where later, from 1941 to 1960, he was a fellow and then director of studies, a demonstrator, an assistant director of research, and finally a reader in experimental biophysics in the Department of Physiology. In 1960 he went to University College, London, first as Jodrell professor and then, from 1969, as Royal Society research professor, in the Department of Physiology.

Huxley and Hodgkin's researches were concerned largely with studying the exchange of sodium and potassium ions that causes a brief reversal in a nerve cell's electrical polarization; this phenomenon, known as an action potential, results in the transmission of an impulse along a nerve fibre. Apart from the researches directly mentioned in the Nobel citation, Huxley made contributions of fundamental importance to knowledge of the process of contraction by a muscle fibre. He published many important papers in periodicals, particularly in the Journal of Physiology. His Sherrington Lectures were published as Reflections on Muscle (1980).


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