Yasunari Kawabata


Yasunari Kawabata
(1899 - 1972)


Japanese novelist who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1968. His melancholic lyricism echoes an ancient Japanese literary tradition in the modern idiom.
The sense of loneliness and preoccupation with death that permeates much of Kawabata's mature writing possibly derives from the loneliness of his childhood (he was orphaned early and lost all near relatives while still in his youth). He graduated from Tokyo Imperial University in 1924 and made his entrance into the literary world with the semiautobiographical Izu no odoriko (1926; The Izu Dancer). It appeared in the journal Bungei jidai ("The Artistic Age"), which he founded with the writer Yokomitsu Riichi; this journal became the organ of the Neosensualist group with which Kawabata was early associated.

This school is said to have derived much of its aesthetic from such post-World War I French literary currents as Dadaism and Expressionism. Their influence on Kawabata's novels may be seen in the abrupt transitions between separate brief, lyrical episodes; in imagery that is frequently startling in its mixture of incongruous impressions; and in his juxtaposition of the beautiful and the ugly. These same qualities, however, are present in Japanese prose of the 17th century and in the renga (linked verse) of the 15th century. It is to the latter that Kawabata's fiction seemed to draw nearer in later years.

There is a formlessness about much of Kawabata's writing that is reminiscent of the fluid composition of renga. His best-known novel, Yukiguni (1948; Snow Country), the story of a forlorn country geisha, was begun in 1935. After several different endings were discarded, it was completed 12 years later, although the final version did not appear until 1948. Sembazuru (Thousand Cranes), a series of episodes centred on the tea ceremony, was begun in 1949 and never completed. These and Yama no oto (1949-54; The Sound of the Mountain) are considered to be his best novels. The later book focuses on the comfort an old man who cannot chide his own children gets from his daughter-in-law.

When Kawabata accepted the Nobel Prize, he said that in his work he tried to beautify death and to seek harmony among man, nature, and emptiness. He committed suicide shortly after the death of his friend Mishima Yukio.


BIBLIOGRAPHY.
Van C. Gessel, Three Modern Novelists: Soseki, Tanizaki, Kawabata (1993), provides an introduction to Kawabata's life and works. Gwenn Boardman Petersen, The Moon in the Water: Understanding Tanizaki, Kawabata, and Mishima (1979, reissued 1990), presents an introductory critical study.


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