Tjalling Charles Koopmans


Tjalling Charles Koopmans
(1910 - 1985)


Dutch-born American economist who shared--with Leonid Kantorovich of the Soviet Union--the Nobel Prize for Economics in 1975. The two men independently developed a rational method, called activity analysis, for allocating resources so as to attain a given economic objective at the lowest cost.
Koopmans was educated in mathematics and physics at the universities of Utrecht and Leiden, obtaining his Ph.D. in economics at Leiden in 1936. In 1940 he went to the United States, where he worked for the British Merchant Shipping Mission during World War II. In that position he was concerned with the selection of shipping routes that would minimize the total cost of transporting required quantities of goods, available at various locations in America, to specified destinations in England. He showed that the desired result is obtainable by the straightforward solution of a system of equations involving the costs of the materials at their sources and the costs of shipping them by alternative routes. He also devised a general mathematical model of the problem that led to the necessary equations.

In 1944 Koopmans joined the Cowles Commission for Research in Economics at the University of Chicago, where he extended his technique to a wide variety of economic problems. When the commission was relocated to Yale University in 1955, Koopmans moved with it, becoming professor of economics at Yale. He wrote a widely read book on the methodology of economic analysis, Three Essays on the State of Economic Science (1957). Koopmans became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1946.



Main Page | About Us | All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License. Timeline of Nobel Prize Winners is not affiliated with The Nobel Foundation. External sites are not endorsed or supported by http://www.nobel-winners.com/ Copyright © 2003 All Rights Reserved.