Victor Grignard


Victor Grignard
(1871-1935)

French chemist and corecipient, with Paul Sabatier, of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1912 for his development of the Grignard reaction. This work in organomagnesium compounds opened a broad area of organic synthesis.
In 1898, while a student under Philippe Barbier at Lyon, Grignard began his prizewinning work with a study of the alkylzinc compounds developed earlier by Sir Edward Frankland. It was Barbier who had Grignard repeat some experiments on the preparation of a tertiary alcohol from a mixture of methyl heptyl ketone, magnesium, and methyl iodide. Grignard hit upon the idea of treating the iodide with the magnesium first and carried out the reaction in ether. This first of the Grignard reagents was a complete success. Grignard's doctoral dissertation (1901) described the preparation of alcohols, acids, and hydrocarbons by means of reactions of organomagnesium compounds. He became professor of chemistry at Nancy (1910) and at Lyon (1919). At the time of his death some 6,000 papers reporting applications of the Grignard reaction had been published.



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