Michael Smith


Michael Smith
(1932)

British-born Canadian biochemist who won (with Kary B. Mullis) the 1993 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for his development of a technique called oligonucleotide-based site-directed mutagenesis, which enabled researchers to introduce specific mutations into genes and, thus, to the proteins that they encode.
Smith received a Ph.D. from the University of Manchester, Eng., in 1956. He became a Canadian citizen in 1964. After holding a number of positions in Canada and the United States, he joined the faculty of the University of British Columbia in 1966, becoming director of the university's biotechnology laboratory in 1987. He was a founder of ZymoGenetics Inc., a biotechnology company.

Smith first conceived of site-directed mutagenesis in the early 1970s and devoted several years to working out the details of the technique. The method provided researchers with a new way to study protein function. A protein is a compound made up of strings of amino acids that fold into a three-dimensional structure, and the protein's structure determines its function. Instructions for the amino-acid sequence of a protein are contained in its gene, namely, in the sequence of DNA subunits, called nucleotides, that make up that gene. The amino-acid sequence of a protein, and hence its function, can be modified by inducing mutations in the nucleotide sequence of its gene. Once an altered protein has been produced, its structure and function can be compared to those of the natural protein. Before the advent of Smith's method, however, the technique biochemical researchers used to create genetic mutations was imprecise and the haphazard approach made it a difficult and time-consuming task. Smith remedied this situation by developing site-directed mutagenesis, a technique that can be used to modify nucleotide sequences at specific, desired locations within a gene. This had made it possible for researchers to determine the role each amino acid plays in protein structure and function. Aside from its value to basic research, site-directed mutagenesis has many applications in medicine, agriculture, and industry. For example, it can be used to produce a protein variant that is more stable, active, or useful than its natural counterpart.



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