Sir Cyril Norman Hinshelwood


Sir Cyril Norman Hinshelwood
(1897-1967)

British chemist who worked on reaction rates and reaction mechanisms, particularly that of the combination of hydrogen and oxygen to form water, one of the most fundamental combining reactions in chemistry. For this work he shared the 1956 Nobel Prize for Chemistry with the Soviet scientist Nikolay Semyonov.
Hinshelwood obtained his doctorate at the University of Oxford in 1924 and became professor of chemistry there in 1937. After retiring from Oxford in 1964 he became a senior research fellow at Imperial College, London.

About 1930 Hinshelwood began investigating the complex reaction in which hydrogen and oxygen atoms combine to form water. He showed that the products of this reaction help to spread the reaction further in what is essentially a chain reaction.

He next sought to explore molecular kinetics within the bacterial cell. Upon observing the biological responses of bacteria to changes in environment, he concluded that more or less permanent changes in a cell's resistance to a drug could be induced. This finding was important in regard to bacterial resistance to antibiotic and other chemotherapeutic agents. Hinshelwood was knighted in 1948. His publications include The Kinetics of Chemical Change in Gaseous Systems (1926) and The Chemical Kinetics of the Bacterial Cell (1946).


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